Ground Control

Hisdesat’s communications systems features a ground control system for its satellites, centers where the telemetry is analyzed and where the commands to be sent to the satellites are prepared. These centers are equipped with TTC (Tracking, Telemetry and Command) antennas and operate 24/7. They feature the most advanced computer systems for controlling and monitoring satellites from the ground.

Due to the governmental nature of the services offered, the highly secure system is made fully redundant through the use of backup components.

Ground Control

Hisdesat’s communications systems features a ground control system for its satellites, centers where the telemetry is analyzed and where the commands to be sent to the satellites are prepared. These centers are equipped with TTC (Tracking, Telemetry and Command) antennas and operate 24/7. They feature the most advanced computer systems for controlling and monitoring satellites from the ground.

Due to the governmental nature of the services offered, the highly secure system is made fully redundant through the use of backup components.

Each satellite has two identical control centers located in geographically separate areas. Each satellite likewise has TTC stations and antennas in two different bands (X and S) located in geographically separate areas (Madrid and Gran Canaria).

Both satellites can be controlled from the ground even if one of the two facilities is completely inoperative, thus guaranteeing users that the service will be available continuously at all times under any circumstances.

Arganda and Maspalomas

in Spain. Currently used for the SPAINSAT satellite and in the future, the INTA center in Madrid, in addition to the one in Maspalomas, will be used for the PAZ and INGENIO satellites.

SpainSat relies on a 16.4-m diameter antenna in the X and S bands, a 6.3-m antenna in the X band in Arganda, and a 6.3-m antenna in Maspalomas. The antennas can be switched instantly to any satellite depending on operating needs.

Ottawa (Canadá) and Mt Jackson (EE.UU.)

for the XTAR-EUR satellite.

Xtar-EUR relies on a 16.4-m diameter antenna in the X and S bands, a 6.3-m antenna in the X band in Maspalomas, in addition to a 6.3-m diameter antenna in Arganda. The antennas can be switched instantly to any satellite depending on operating needs.